Thursday, 05 October 2017 11:41

Blue collar worker had enough with climate change

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Editor:


I am a blue-collar worker—a guy who gets his hands dirty on a daily basis—and I have a question for my fellow blue-collar workers:
At what point are we going to speak up and say to our governments, “ENOUGH!”?
We know that many politicians don’t support us, or the efforts of our families. Instead, they cling to their ideologies and misplaced personal beliefs, and then use these screwy values systems to control our lives.
All this political correctness is wearing on a lot of people—removing the right to disagree, speak out, question ideologies, etc. I often wonder who wrote the rules for political correctness and where I can get a copy.
Ordinary blue-collar types don’t have places where we can easily voice our displeasure or even question the results of reckless ideology being turned into legislation apart from public consultation or a referendum on the matter.
One of these ideological considerations is climate change—global warming.
The government "suits" are shutting down our industries, taking away our jobs, and destroying the ability to provide for our families—all in the name of climate change. When anyone asks for the evidence or research reports that the Alberta government uses to justify closure of our coal plants, rather than provide hard data, the “suits” cover their ears with their hands and call people deniers. That’s not informed debate. That’s not honest dialogue. That’s not reasoned discussion.
These people are paid in full by us. They reap enormous financial benefits even as they undermine our ability to provide for ourselves and our families.
I read a Sept. 12 article in Edmonton Journal. It’s called “Connecting the Dots Between NDP’s Coal Phase Out Plan and Hurricanes.”
The article blames hurricanes on coal-induced CO2 emissions and endorses the shutdown of coal power plants. Then it suggests that coal communities are filled with biased workers who value money over climate.
The article then talks about the NDP giving Hanna a $450,000 grant to diversify the local coal-based economy.
When compared, the amounts of this taxpayer-funded grant and the actual cost of the shutdowns are miles apart. There are individual families in these communities who will likely lose an amount equal to 10% of that grant or more just on the value of their homes.
Huge numbers of people are losing—owners and workers at support industries, devaluation of property and business holdings. And where are these people going to work when the shutdowns are completed? This is not going to be fixed with $450,000.
In the Journal article slamming these small towns and claiming that Alberta coal plants cause hurricanes, there is absolutely no scientific information—only innuendo and allegations. Instead, the Journal quotes the pope as an authority on science.
Graham Thomson, who wrote the article, isn’t a hurricane scientist either. This being true, it raises the question: Is his editorial version of "connecting the dots" simply a best guess—an alarmist’s fantasy?
This question is one of many that I’ve been asked by my fellow blue-collar workers. They want to know, who supports us.
If an ordinary person agrees with this harmful ideology as it’s presented, then they can respond with silence and simply move on. But for those of us who disagree, surely the time to talk is now.
John Satink, Drumheller

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