Wednesday, 15 August 2018 15:01

Sask. harvest starts slow (July 31 to August 6)

Written by  Sask.Agriculture
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Producers in the province have one per cent of the crop combined and two per cent swathed or ready to straight-cut, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s weekly Crop Report.


The five-year average for this time of year is one per cent combined. Reported yields so far range from average to well-below average.
Fifty-five per cent of the fall rye, 15 per cent of the winter wheat, eight per cent of the field peas and seven per cent of the lentils are now in the bin. One per cent of the canola has been swathed.
Harvest is most advanced in the south, where three per cent of the crop is combined.
Most producers in the central and northern regions are expecting to be in the field within the next few weeks.
There was scattered rainfall in parts of the province this week, with some storms bringing hail.
While the rain was welcomed in some areas, it may be too late to benefit the south, where crops are rapidly drying down. Most crops remain in fair condition, although later-seeded crops need rain to help heads and pods fill.
Topsoil moisture conditions have improved slightly with the recent rainfall. Provincial topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are currently rated as 42 per cent adequate, 40 per cent short and 18 per cent very short.
Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 32 per cent adequate, 41 per cent short and 27 per cent very short.
Hay yields are below average overall. Estimated average dryland hay yields for the province are: 1.1 tons per acre for alfalfa and alfalfa/bromegrass; 0.9 ton per acre for other tame hay; 1.0 ton per acre for wild hay and 1.6 tons per acre for greenfeed.
Estimated average irrigated hay yields are: 2.8 tons per acre for alfalfa; 2.7 tons per acre for alfalfa/bromegrass; 2.2 tons per acre for other tame hay; 2.0 tons per acre for wild hay and 3.3 tons per acre for greenfeed.
The majority of crop damage this past week is attributed to lack of moisture, strong winds and hot temperatures. Some areas, including Cabri and Leader, received hail that caused severe damage to crops. Producers are busy harvesting, hauling bales and desiccating crops.

Crop District 3ASW – Coronach, Assiniboia and Ogema areas; Crop District 3AN – Gravelbourg, Mossbank, Mortlach and Central Butte areas;
Crop District 3B – Kyle, Swift Current , Shaunavon and Ponteix areas;
Crop District 4 – Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas
For the Period July 31 to August 6, 2018
Harvest is under way in the region. Three per cent of the crop is combined and four per cent is swathed or ready to straight-cut. The five-year (2012-2016) average for this time of year is two per cent combined.
Eighty-two per cent of the fall rye, 36 per cent of the winter wheat, 19 per cent of the field peas and five per cent of the lentils are now in the bin. One per cent of the canola has been swathed.
Several areas received scattered thunderstorms this week, which caused some hail damage. The Shaunovan area received 5 mm of rain, the Mortlach area 38 mm, the Success area 21 mm and the Cabri area 40 mm. The Vanguard area has received the most rainfall (193 mm) in the area since April 1.
Many areas could use moisture to improve topsoil conditions and reduce fire risks.
Topsoil remains short of moisture, due to high temperatures. Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as 16 per cent adequate, 44 per cent short and 40 per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture conditions are rated as ten per cent adequate, 40 percent short and 50 per cent very short.
Reported crop yields range from average to well-below average, but the quality is good, so far. Strong winds, high temperatures and lack of moisture were the main causes of crop damage this past week. There have been reports of crop damage from severe hail in some areas. Haying is wrapping up and yields remain significantly lower than normal.
Producers are busy desiccating pulse crops, combining and hauling bales.

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