Thursday, 10 August 2017 09:36

Harvest underway in Sask.

Written by  Saskatchewan Agriculture
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Harvest is underway for some producers in the south, according to Saskatchewan Agriculture’s Weekly Crop Report released Aug. 3.


Less than one per cent of the provincial crop has been combined, while slightly more than one per cent is ready to straight-cut.
Forty-seven per cent of fall rye, six per cent of winter wheat, two per cent of lentils and one per cent of field peas are now in the bin.  Many pulse crops in southern and central areas are being desiccated.  Reported yields so far range from average to well below average, depending on field and moisture conditions.
Most of the province received little to no rain this past week, although the Glaslyn area reported 38 mm over the weekend.  Many areas remain very dry and will need significant rain to fill crops and replenish topsoil moisture. For some producers in the south, crops are rapidly drying down and any rainfall now will come too late to be of benefit.
Topsoil moisture conditions have worsened with the lack of rain and high temperatures.  In most of the south along the U.S. and Alberta borders, 100 per cent of cropland, hay land and pasture is short to very short topsoil moisture.
Crops are ripening quickly in many areas and most range from poor to good condition.
Crop damage this week is mainly attributed to hot temperatures, hail, localized flooding, strong winds and lack of rain.  There are many reports of insects such as aphids, diamondback moths and grasshoppers.
Haying is wrapping up for many livestock producers and yields remain significantly lower than normal.
Producers are getting ready for harvest, scouting for pests and finishing haying operations.
Southwestern Saskatchewan: Crop District 3ASW – Coronach, Assiniboia and Ogema areas; Crop District 3AN – Gravelbourg, Mossbank, Mortlach and Central Butte areas; Crop District 3B – Kyle, Swift Current , Shaunavon and Ponteix areas; Crop District 4 – Consul, Maple Creek and Leader areas
Some producers in the southwest have begun harvest. One per cent of the crop has been combined and six per cent is swathed or ready to straight-cut. Eighty-four per cent of the fall rye, 28 per cent of the winter wheat and two per cent of the lentils and field peas are now in the bin. Most producers are hoping to be in the field within the next couple of weeks. Reported yields so far range from average to well below average, depending on field and moisture conditions throughout the year.
Hot temperatures and lack of moisture continue to stress crops, hay land and pasture. The region received little to no rain, although the Big Beaver area reported 7 mm. The Moose Jaw area holds the record for the most precipitation (132 mm) in the region since April 1.
Many areas of the region have not received much more than two or three inches of rainfall since April 1; many crops in these areas are severely heat-stressed and are rapidly drying down.
Topsoil moisture conditions have deteriorated in the past week with the high temperatures and lack of moisture. Topsoil moisture on cropland is rated as three per cent adequate, 39 per cent short and 58 per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as three per cent adequate, 34 per cent short and 63 per cent very short.
All crop districts in the region are reporting that at least 93 per cent of cropland, hay land and pasture is short to very short topsoil moisture. CDs 3ASW, 3BS, 4A and 4B each report that 100 per cent of cropland, hay land and pasture is short to very short topsoil moisture. Although significant rainfall is needed in the region to help crops fill and replenish the topsoil moisture, the rain will be too late for many areas. Crops there are rapidly ripening and have already been severely affected by heat and drought stress.
The majority of crop damage this week was due to lack of moisture, high temperatures, hail, strong winds and insects such as aphids, diamondback moths and grasshoppers.
Many are concerned about the high fire risk in much of the region as harvest approaches.
Haying operations are wrapping up and yields are significantly lower than normal; there is a shortage of hay in much of the region. Pasture conditions are rated as three per cent good, 25 per cent fair, 52 per cent poor and 20 per cent very poor.
Producers are busy preparing for harvest, scouting for pests and finishing haying operations.

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