Wednesday, 15 March 2017 11:28

Pincher Creek man still pumping iron in his eighties

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Joe Stockinger grips the bar, adjusts his footing and lifts the weight with ease; an impressive feat for any 87-year-old. That’s right. He’s a senior and a weightlifter and a successful one at that. Stockinger holds several world records.


Within the 100 per cent Raw Powerlifting Federation, Stockinger owns the world record book for an event called full power, which has three components: the bench press, the deadlift and the squat. The Pincher Creek man has the highest lift in each component plus the highest overall total.
One of his senior world records is for bench pressing 198 lbs or 90 kg, a remarkable total regardless of age.
The octogenarian is motivated to continue weightlifting because of the inspiration it gives others.
Stockinger was born in 1929 near Munich, Germany. As a young man, he worked in coal mines and was in his twenties when he began weightlifting. He moved to Canada in 1954 when he was 24 and worked on a farm in Ontario. More than 60 years later, he is still lifting weights. He owns Joe’s Weight Training and Fitness Club in Pincher Creek.
He has competed at world championships in South Africa and the Czech Republic. Apart from his involvement as a competitor, he is a weightlifting referee.
In 1983, Stockinger played a pivotal role in founding the Alberta Powerlifting Union, an organization that strives to test how much the human body can lift within a drug-free environment.
He was made the APU’s first hall of fame member in 2013 “because of his commitment to powerlifting, his volunteerism spirit, his enthusiasm for sport, and his long, rewarding career as an athlete.”
To be a successful weightlifter, Stockinger believes it’s important to train regularly, as in several times a week, and to avoid stress. Staying well rested is also important.
I met Stockinger at a powerlifting competition held at Temple Fitness in Medicine Hat Feb. 18.
While speaking with him, it soon became obvious despite his age he still has a zest for life. His energy and enthusiasm are contagious.
Vitality is a trait I’ve seen in other seniors who remain active into their eighties and beyond. I’m convinced their combination of positive attitude and youthful spirit allows them to age so well. One of these seniors is Dale Sanders, an 81-year-old who’s currently on a six-month, 2,200-mile hike from Georgia to Maine. We’ll check in with him in the next edition of Your Life is Now to see where he’s at and how his adventure is going.
In the meantime, if you’d like to learn more about aging well, I invite you to research Blue Zones. They are the places on earth where people live to 100 and beyond the most often. More information is available at: www.bluezones.com.
Dominique Liboiron is a speaker, author, teacher, journalist and photographer. To raise awareness about heart disease and to honour the life of one of its victims, Liboiron canoed from Saskatchewan to New Orleans. He is the first person to undertake that journey. He enjoys outdoor sports such as camping, hunting, fly fishing and canoeing. For more information about his speaking engagements, phone 306-661-8975 or visit www.canoetoneworleans.com.

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Dominique Liboiron

Dominique Liboiron is a speaker, author, teacher, journalist and photographer. To raise awareness about heart disease and to honour the life of one of its victims, Liboiron canoed from Saskatchewan to New Orleans. He is the first person to undertake that journey. He enjoys outdoor sports such as camping, hunting, fly fishing and canoeing.